Petit Pli expandable clothing

The clothes physically grow with your kid.

Petit Pli created a type of children’s clothes that could physically grow with your kids.

A child wearing the garment can stretch and continue wearing the clothing as they grow bigger in size. Image via Petit Pli
A child runs around in the stretchable garment. Image via Petit Pli

The Petit Pli is a project that looks to reduce overconsumption. Nowadays, parents on average spend between $28 to $44 on infant clothing per month,
according to Livestrong.

A child can grow seven sizes from age zero to two, said Ryan Mario Yasin, the creator of Petit Pli. His design can fit most kids from nine months old to four years old, Yasin added.

A toddler putting on the Petit Pli. Image via Petit Pli
A toddler wears the Petit Pli. Image via Petit Pli

The Petit Pli costs $168 per suit. It is available in black, blue and green.

Petit Pli uses heat treatment and a process called permanent pleating that lets the garment to stretch to fit the sizes of the child. Image via Petit Pli
The clothing material undergoes the permanent pleating process. Image via Petit Pli

The clothes are made with lightweight polyester synthetic material. When being stretched, the material will grow thicker to maintain the integrity of the clothes.

“An auxetic structure has been embedded in Petit Pli fabrics, giving the clothing a negative Poisson’s ratio,” said Yasin. The polyester material is waterproof, machine washable and recyclable.

A child bends down and stretches on the polyester fabric of Petit Pli. Image via Petit Pli
A child bends down and stretches on the polyester fabric of Petit Pli. Image via Petit Pli

Yasin came up with the idea for Petit Pli when buying clothes for his nephew. He studied child ergonomics and created 500 prototypes before settling on the material and design.

Yasin holding his design artworks. Image via James Dyson Award
Yasin holds his design artworks. Image via James Dyson Award

The Petit Pli won the UK James Dyson Award in Sept. 2017.

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